Student Research Conference

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A Relational Framework for Modelling Active Intruders
We present a relational framework for the purpose of modeling active attackers, inspired by the success of Kripke Semantics in formal security. Our analysis stems from the open problem of finding a satisfactory semantics for modeling active attackers with the eventual hope of mechanically checking formulas describing attack scenarios via automated verification techniques. In this regard, our approach is to be extended (in the fullness of time) to complement the existing techniques of epistemic temporal logic and automated verification that has already been so well explored elsewhere. Our relational framework is original in that it applies techniques from Gunther Schmidt’s relational mathematics program to a new application domain –that of information security and assurance –and employs Boolean matrices defined on relations to enforce verification of security designs, and thus offers (in finite cases) a decidable framework for representing and verifying security designs. We provide characterization theorems (for example, demonstrating that a general version of our framework is a Boolean algebra) in addition to definitions, theorems and practical examples based on intuitive security properties drawn from information security examples. We conclude with some partial results and comments on complexity considerations.
3D Printing Prosthetics with E-Nable
The first part of this experience was to 3D print a working prosthetic hand for a child with no fingers (based on an open source hand design). The second part of the research was to prove that printing a high quality plastic hand could be done using a $600 printer versus a $2000 printer. 3D printing is the next new thing in many fields such as medical or business. Regular prosthetics cost tens of thousands of dollars to make for someone missing a hand, fingers, or a leg. In addition, children rapidly outgrow these expensive prosthetics. Our 3D-printed prosthetics only cost $30 to $50. Our focus is helping children born without fingers, but these could help adults as well, especially people in the military. The research was conducted by first understanding how to use a 3D printer. The technology is still not considered “plug and play” and therefore it requires a large amount of testing to achieve successful prints. Due to the cutting-edge nature of this technology, a variety of challenges had to be overcome.The primary challenge was calibration of the printer. 3D printing depends on very precise alignment of molten plastic emerging from a tiny 0.4 mm nozzle. This nozzle has to rest within fractions of a millimeter from a print surface, necessitating extremely precise setup of the printer. When an issue or problem occurred that couldn’t be answered, the research turned towards help from experts through user forums. We scaffolded our project by spending several weeks perfecting smaller prints (a calibration cube and a shark figurine) and progressing to larger items (finger pins/caps) and finally full palms and gauntlets. Printing the full hand was tedious and revealed unforeseen challenges relating to the length and size of the print. Previous prints were 30-60 minutes, while the palm was a multiple hour job. This introduced new challenges (including recalibration for larger parts, assuring adequate cooling, etc.). After 1 month, we successfully printed our first hand, and I attended a research conference in Baltimore in September 2014 that discussed 3D-printed prosthetics and provided information on assembling a hand. Based on this conference, we adjusted the research to focus on printing the latest design of the E-nable project and I had Marymount join as an official partner of the E-nable community. It took approximately two months to print a fully functional hand with the same quality as the $2,000 printer due to calibration, school breaks, and hours of messed up prints. Our research, however, definitively proves that you can print a hand with the same quality on a $600 printer instead of a $2,000 printer. We are now awaiting a match through E-nable that will connect us with a recipient in need of a hand. We will use the experience of this research project to perform appropriate measurements and provide a custom -printed, functional, 3D-prosthetic hand for an individual in need. This project is significant to my pursuits within the medical field. I want to have a career as a physician assistant.
Adlerian Intervention and Techniques to Promote Self-Esteem in School-Age Children
The purpose of this presentation is identify and present the significant role that the development of school age children's self-esteem and interpersonal skills have on their self-concept, as it relates to academic success. This process will be examined using the Adlerian therapy approach to developing self-esteem and interpersonal skills in children. There are many things that may contribute to a child’s self-esteem, such as environmental factors, peer relationships, and social connectedness. Another aspect of the many things that may influence self-esteem also includes a child’s sense of worth and the need to belong. The main tenet in Adlerian view includes social interest and striving, particularly within the school. Based upon the literature, Adlerian therapy and interventions has proven to be effective for improving a child’s self-esteem. The concept of Adlerian interventions was the main focus in this review, in addressing school-aged children’s self- esteem as it relates to academic success. Adlerian Therapy places emphasis on the holistic approach to development and how it is connected to the purpose of human behavior. Adler believes a healthy lifestyle, as part of the child’s developmental process, is the goal for school counselors and clinicians in understanding and promoting the uniqueness of a child. These efforts to encourage the child through counseling interventions and techniques will enhance the child’s well- being and self-efficacy.
The American Dream
The purpose of this creative work is to explore the Marymount community's perspective on the American Dream. We will focus on each individual's personal definition of the American Dream, the problems that groups may face while attempting to reach their dream, and what America can do to help individuals achieve their dream. Through film, we can represent various definitions from diverse walks of life. It is imperative to understand our community's dreams in relation to what we can do to help each other succeed. Moreover, through this study we can understand the struggles and perspectives of others. Overall, this project signifies how the American Dream affects not only the Marymount community, but it is a glimpse of how it affects America as a whole. We reached out to students, faculty, and staff at Marymount through classes, flyers, and email. We used a list of set interview questions about what the interviewee's American Dream was, how he or she could achieve it, what obstacles prevent people from being able to achieve their American Dream, and more. After receiving consent to film interviews from the individuals, we had footage of perspectives from various cultures, genders, religions, and classes. In all we found that many interviewees saw the American Dream as the opportunity to achieve happiness and leave a mark on the world. Happiness was a common theme in our conversations whether it concerned family, job satisfaction, or helping others. However, when we asked individuals if everyone could achieve the American Dream, the responses varied. Some interviewees were very positive and believed that no matter what, a dream can be achieved if you can work hard enough. On the other hand, others believed that there are barriers and circumstances out of our control that can stand in our way and prevent us from being able to fulfill our American Dream. This film overall had a very positive response and through social media and continued advertisement, we have brought this project into the Marymount community. Over the next four weeks we intend to continue the American Dream discussion and raise awareness of the varying perspectives within our community. This project is a demonstration of Performance Media being used to focus on the human condition. By incorporating the experience of individuals from different background we are using film to expose the reality of many people's lives. This project is an example of how art can be used to generate conversation, raise awareness, and initiate ideas for positive change.
Analyzing Challenges Facing Global Health Efforts to Eradicate Malaria in Sub-Saharan Africa
Malaria is an infectious disease caused by one of the plasmodia species that breed in the female anopheles mosquito. Plasmodium falciparum is the most severe and prevalent in Sub-Saharan Africa. Despite the fact that Malaria is a preventable and curable disease, it is endemic in over 90 countries. According to the latest estimates in the World Malaria report of 2014, 198 million cases occurred globally in 2013, and the disease led to over 500,000 deaths. The report also estimated international and domestic funding for malaria control and elimination for 2013 to be $2.7 billion. Even though malaria is a global disease, the burden is heaviest in the African region where 90% of malaria deaths occur. Since 1955, global health organizations have doubled their efforts for funding, vaccine development and, research, in an effort to eradicate malaria. However, the efforts in Sub-Saharan Africa region have been met with challenges like vector control, the changing epidemiology of malaria, donor fatigue, concurrent management of malaria and other diseases, data reporting, cultural and health care worker shortage and many others problems. This presentation will summarize a review of published literature over the last 10 years on the challenges that global health efforts have, and continue to encounter in their attempts to eradicate malaria in Sub-Saharan Africa. This presentation will conclude with recommendations for future research and identify efforts to overcome the challenges of eradicating Malaria in Sub-Saharan Africa.
A Balance-Based Approach to Intervention Following Intramedullary Nailing of a Tibial Fracture: A Case Report
Background and Purpose Falls among the elderly are considered a leading cause of fatal injury and hospital admissions. Fall scan lead to a decreased level of independence and increase the risk for fractures. Intramedullary nail placement is a widely used surgical treatment for fractures of long bones, such as the tibia. There is currently a deficit in the literature reporting on this procedure and also on the proper rehabilitation approach to returning a patient to their previous level of function. Case Description The subject is an86 year old male that experienced a distal tibia and fibula fracture of his left leg after a fall. He underwent open reduction and internal fixation of the tibia within tramedullary nail placement. The purpose of this case report is to describe a balance and functional mobility focused intervention following intramedullary nailing of a tibial fracture in an elderly adult. Outcomes The Berg Balance Scale (BBS) was used to assess static balance, dynamic balance, and fall risk.Activity and participation outcomes were used to measure functional mobility and independence. These outcomes included total distance ambulated, stairs negotiated, functional transfer ability, and assistance level required for functional tasks. Discussion The patient demonstrated improvements in all functional outcomes along with a decreased level of assistance. Upon completion of the intervention, the patient was deemed a low fall risk according to the BBS. Further research is necessary in order to establish the optimal rehabilitation protocol to return similar patients to their prior level of function and to prevent future falls.
Cannibalism in Colonial America
I plan on focusing on the hardships and cannibalism that took place in Early Jamestown during the starving time. This is an important topic due to the fact that the bones of “Jane” a fifteen-year-old girl found cannibalized in Jamestown was only found in 2010. Since being unearthed, “Jane” has undergone the best science has to offer in order to find her origination and how she came to have tooth marks on her bones. There has been little recognition for this young girl and I would like to bring her story to the surface. Many people think of Pocahontas running through the forest singing to John Smith and showing him the way of the New World when they think about Jamestown and the first colonists. However, what historically happened in the early years of Jamestown is much darker. Young bones found in an excavated cellar tell the story of a fifteen-year-old Jamestown transplant. Jane, as she would be called, shows just how dark and desperate the early colonists in 1609 Jamestown really were and to what ends human beings would fall in the evolutionary spectrum to survive. Could this darkness be avoided? Research shows the starving time as a test on humanity that George Percy is to trudge through with his dwindling number of colonists. Was the starving time an inevitability that nature played on these men and women or would John Smith have been a better alternative, had he not been injured? Nearly every important event that happened in Jamestown was well documented by the governing force or a bystander in their journal; except for Smith’s incident. Could the lack of information prove foul play? Nature, circumstances, fate, and leadership play key roles in the travesty that was the starving time and the tragic end to Jane’s life. The evidence found at Jamestown and the journals and research on the topic, all point to the starving time as preventable, but how? I would like to teach seventh or eleventh grade history; both of which involve Jamestown and colonial America. This topic is also one that I find interesting; therefore, it makes teaching our youth a pleasure.
Chronic anterior bilateral exertional compartment syndrome management following fasciotomy: A Case Report
Background and Purpose Chronic exertional compartment syndrome occurs most often in individuals that are athletes, especially avid runners, and military personnel. Fasciotomy is the gold standard medical intervention for individuals who wish to return to their prior level of activity. Currently, there is very limited research on the most effective rehabilitation program following fasciotomy. Case Description The subject of this case report is a 34 year old female avid runner that was diagnosed with bilateral anterior chronic exertional compartment syndrome. She underwent surgical decompression surgery to release the fascia on her left lower leg only. The purpose of this case report is to describe a rehabilitation program for a patient following anterior compartment fasciotomy. Outcomes The lower extremity functional scale (LEFS) and foot and ankle ability measure were used to track progress of lower extremity function overtime. Single leg stance (SLS) was used to measure balance. The six-minute walk test (6MWT) was administered to assess progression of walking distance. Girth measurements were taken to measure swelling and edema. Goniometry and manual muscle testing (MMT) were used to capture improvements in range of motion (ROM) and strength. Discussion The results of this intervention include improvements in LEFS, FAAM, SLS, 6MWT, girth measurements, ROM, and MMT at time of self-discharge on the left lower extremity. Self- discharge was due to becoming symptomatic on the right lower extremity during running activities. Although results were favorable in this case report for the left lower extremity, further research is necessary in order to establish the most effective rehabilitation course for this population.
Colorectal cancer screening in African American Men
African-American men have a one in 20 lifetime chance of developing colorectal cancer. Despite guidelines from the American College of Gastroenterology that African-American men with average risk start screening for colorectal cancer at age 45, only 56% are current with screening. Patient navigation is one intervention that has been utilized to combat barriers to colorectal cancer screening. Patient navigation includes patient education, scheduling assistance, and reminders by telephone or mail. The aim of the study was to investigate whether patient navigation as an intervention increases colorectal screening rates in African American men. A thorough appraisal of the literature revealed that patient navigation significantly raised colorectal screening rates. Furthermore, research demonstrated that either professional or peer navigators are equally effective. Early detection of colorectal cancer improves treatment options and quality of life for patients. Patient navigation is a cost effective, patient-centric evidence based practice that facilities increasing rates of colorectal cancer screening.
Costa Rica Service-Learning Project: What Education Students learned from Individuals with Severe Disabilities
In August 2014, Marymount students (n=9) in a graduate-level education course conducted a service-learning (S-L) project at Fundación Hogar Manos Abiertas in Costa Rica. A residential program, Manos Abiertas provides full-care for abandoned individuals who have severe disabilities including autism, intellectual disabilities, cerebral palsy, blindness, and deafness. Most residents are nonverbal, use wheelchairs, and have fine motor skill difficulties. In collaboration with teachers at Manos Abiertas, the Marymount team prepared relevant, multisensory, intercultural lesson activities, designed to promote self-advocacy and self -determination. In “structured” reflections we wrote about our interactions with residents during the activities we conducted at Manos. Back home we analyzed the contents of pre-& post reflection assignments to discover major themes as we sought to determine: (1) collective research foci drawn from our pre- trip questions about interacting and conducting activities with the residents; (2)the impact the experience had on us personally and professionally; especially the effects residents had on our initial assumptions, apprehensions, and questions about their disabilities and our capacity to provide appropriate instruction for them. Through this S-L research, the residents taught us a great deal about what it means to be human. Not only learned did we learn from them how to overcome substantial communication barriers, we also developed our capacities to assess, adapt, and scaffold for individual needs. Furthermore we acknowledged how this experience helped us gain confidence in our abilities to interact with, “get-to-know”, and teach individuals from diverse backgrounds and with a wide range of cognitive, physical, and communicative needs.

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